Sicily food holidays

Sicily was defined the pearl of the Mediterranean because of its central position, which made it a crossroads for centuries. In this itinerary five different foodie areas are covered, starting from Palermo, the capital of the island: a fusion of several styles and monuments, it also boasts amazing cuisine and wonderful weather year-round. Moving towards the western coast, you can reach the archeological treasure of Segesta which boasts both a Doric temple and a theatre built by the Greeks around the 4th century B.C: situated at the top of the hill, it's still used for representations of Greek tragedies, and offers the most breathtaking and seemingly endless views of Sicily. In the Sicilian heart, you can walk into an authentic Roman house, the ancient Villa del Casale situated in Piazza Armerina, while the deep south is characterised by baroque architecture which finds its best expression in the majestic churches of Ragusa, Noto and Modica. Finally, the Natural Park of Etna, recently classified as a UNESCO World Heritage site, has a large variety of rocks, plants and animals, perfect for all nature lovers.

  1. Palermo and its traditional street food

    From the Phoenicians to the Spaniards, Palermo was conquered by many populations. One of the most characteristic periods is the Arab-Norman civilization (IX-XI). Several are the traces of this mingled culture, from the magnificent Cathedral to the Royal Palace, including the church of S.Giovanni degli Eremiti or the Zisa Castle, residence of the Norman kings.

    The "Focacceria San Francesco" for anyone born in the city is an institution with regards to the typical street food. Cornerstones of this cuisine are the spleen sandwich and the "panelle and crocchè". The first one is a rounded bread stuffed with pieces of cow spleen and lung, while the panelle are chickpea fritters and always go with the potato croquettes. If you stop by they are a must!

    View Palermo rentals

  2. The western coast and its unique seafood cuisine

    The cuisine in this area is essentially based on seafood. The most renowned dish is the couscous which finds its roots in the North African tradition, but was personalised over the centuries by the locals using the products offered from the sea: rockfish, sea bass or bream. You can have a superb couscous at the restaurant "Saverino", Bonagia di Trapani, a family business where you can also try the typical recipes: spaghetti with bottarga, mussel soup, fried calamari, and so forth!

    After lunch why not try stopping in Marsala, where the most prestigious dessert wine takes its name from? At the Cantine Florio there are guided tours available, to discover how this Sicilian excellence is produced.

    View Marsala rentals

     
  3. In the heart of Sicily, traditional food with a personal touch

    The Roman villa is located about 3 kilometres outside the town of Piazza Armerina, in the centre of Sicily. The residence of a member of the Roman senatorial aristocracy, probably a governor, it was built on the top of a rustic villa between the 1st century and the second half of the 3rd century A.D.

    Not far from this piece of history you can have a mouthwatering lunch in a cosy and elegant restaurant, offering traditional Sicilian ingredients revisited by the chef Angelo Treno with his original touch. Starters, homemade bread, fresh pasta and lovely desserts will make eating at "Al Fogher" a memorable experience. Have a try!

    View Enna rentals

     
     
  4. Mushroom specialty in the most evocative site of eastern Sicily

    The so-called "Sentiero del Germoplasma" is a walking itinerary accessible to everyone, and thanks to its extraordinary territory and landscape, is considered a unique environment in which men and women can get in touch with nature again.

    After exploring the park and breathing some pure air, you'll reach Nicolosi, situated on the southern slope of the volcano. Mushroom lovers should have dinner at "Il Tucano", a rustic restaurant that reminds me of a mountain chalet. The speciality of the place is fungi, so try the remarkable "pappardelle ai porcini", scrumptious homemade pasta accompanied by a superb choice of Sicilian wines. It's definitely something you don't want to miss!

    View Nicolosi rentals

     
  5. The deep south with its fresh local products

    The Baroque architecture of the south is characterised by massive columns and elaborate decoration, with great examples including the imposing cathedrals of San Nicolò (Noto) and San Giorgio (Ragusa).

    After wandering around these evocative towns, why not drive to a rural agritourism area to have an exquisite lunch? The “Azienda agricola Magazzè” is known for its buffalo breeding, producing genuine products and offering a fixed menu with all sorts of tempting treats. There's everything from traditional starters to local liquors like limoncello. While in Modica, try the local chocolate of the island: it was imported by the Spaniards back in the 16th century, and is still produced in the old way today. It's a treat you'll want to try twice!

    View Modica rentals